Bear paw succulent care

How to Grow And Care For Bear Paw Succulent

The bear paw succulent (Kalanchoe tomentosa) is a unique and beautiful plant that is perfect for adding interest to any garden or home décor. This succulent is easy to care for, and with the right tips, you can help it grow and thrive. Read on for more information on how to grow and care for a bear paw succulent.

What is a bear paw succulent?

The bear paw succulent is a member of the Kalanchoe family, and is native to Madagascar. It gets its name from its furry, gray-green leaves that resemble a bear’s paw. The plant can grow up to 12 inches tall, and has a sprawling habit. The leaves are thick and fleshy, and are arranged in a rosette pattern. These plants produce yellow or red flowers that bloom in the springtime.

Bear paw succulent
Bear paw succulent (By Istockphoto)

Bear paw succulent care

Watering

They are drought tolerant, and can go weeks without being watered. When you do water your plant, be sure to give it a good soaking, and then allow the soil to dry out completely before watering again. These plants are sensitive to overwatering, so be sure not to water more than once every two weeks.

Soil needs

Bear paw succulents need well-draining soil in order to prevent root rot. A cactus or succulent potting mix will work well, or you can make your own by mixing one part sand with two parts potting soil.

Fertilizing

These do not need to be fertilized, but if you want to give your plant a boost, you can fertilize it once a month with a half-strength cactus fertilizer. Be sure to stop fertilizing in the fall and winter, when the plant is dormant.

Light & temperature

Bear paw succulents prefer bright, indirect light, but can tolerate some direct sun. These plants are not frost hardy, so be sure to bring them indoors or cover them if temperatures are expected to dip below 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

Take care of bear paw
Take care of bear paw (By Istockphoto)

Pruning & grooming

These plants do not require pruning, but you can trim off any dead or dying leaves to keep your plant looking its best. These plants are also relatively low-maintenance when it comes to grooming; simply wipe the leaves with a damp cloth to remove any dust or debris.

Size & growth

Bear paw succulents are slow-growing plants, and will only need to be repotted every two to three years. These plants can reach a height of 12 inches, but typically stay much smaller.

How to propagate cotyledon bear paw succulent?

Cotyledon, or bear paw succulents can be propagated in water or soil.

Propagating bear paw cuttings in water:

1.Take a sharp knife or scissors and cut a piece of stem that includes 2-3 leaves.

2.Remove the bottom leaves from the cutting, and dip the end of the stem in rooting hormone.

3.Place the stem in a jar or glass of water, and place it in a bright spot out of direct sunlight.

4.Change the water every few days to keep it fresh, and roots should form within 2-3 weeks.

5.Once the roots are a few inches long, you can transplant the cutting into a pot of well-draining soil.

Propagating bear paw cuttings in soil:

1.Take a sharp knife or scissors and cut a piece of stem that includes 2-3 leaves.

2.Remove the bottom leaves from the cutting, and dip the end of the stem in rooting hormone.

3.Fill a pot with well-draining soil, and make a small hole in the center.

4.Place the cutting in the hole, and gently firm the soil around it.

5.Water the soil, and place the pot in a bright spot out of direct sunlight.

6.Roots should form within 2-3 weeks, and you can transplant the cutting into a larger pot once they are a few inches long.

Propagating bear paw
Propagating bear paw (By Istockphoto)

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Common problems for bear’s paw succulent

1. Pests/insects on bear’s paw succulent

Spider mites, aphids, and mealybugs are all common pests that can infest bear paw succulents. These pests suck the nutrients out of the plant, and can cause the leaves to turn yellow or brown. If you notice any pests on your plant, you can treat them with an insecticidal soap or neem oil.

2. Overwatered bear’s paw succulent

Overwatering is the most common cause of death for bear paw succulents. These plants are drought tolerant, and can go weeks without being watered. When you do water your plant, be sure to give it a good soaking, and then allow the soil to dry out completely before watering again. These plants are especially susceptible to root rot, so it is important to make sure the soil is well-draining.

3. Brown leaves on bear’s paw succulent

If the leaves on your plant start to turn brown, it is usually a sign of overwatering or pests. Be sure to check the roots of your plant to make sure they are not rotting, and take steps to correct the problem. Brown leaves can also be caused by too much sun exposure, so be sure to give your plant some protection from the hot afternoon sun.

4. Cold hardiness of bear’s paw succulent

Bear paw succulents are not cold hardy, and will not tolerate temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. If you live in an area with cold winters, be sure to bring your plant indoors or protect it with a frost blanket when the temperature starts to drop.

Frequently Asked Question

Is bear paw succulent rare?

No, bear paw succulents are not rare. These plants are native to South Africa, and have been widely cultivated around the world. However, they are not as common as some other succulent varieties, such as sedum or echeveria.

How big do this succulents get?

Bear paw succulents can grow up to 12 inches tall, but typically stay much smaller. These plants are perfect for small pots or dish gardens.

Do bear paw succulents need full sun?

No, This plants do not need full sun. These plants prefer bright light, but can tolerate some shade. If you live in a hot climate, it is best to protect your plant from the afternoon sun to prevent leaf scorch.

How often should I water my bear paw succulent?

They are drought tolerant, and can go several weeks without being watered. When you do water your plant, be sure to give it a good soaking, and then allow the soil to dry out completely before watering again. These plants are especially susceptible to root rot, so it is important to make sure the soil is well-draining.

How long do bear paws last?

Bear paw succulents can last for many years with proper care. These plants are relatively low maintenance, and can tolerate a wide range of growing conditions. With proper care, your plant should continue to thrive for many years.

How much is a bear paw succulent?

Bear paw succulents typically range in price from $5 to $10. These plants are widely available online and at nurseries and garden centers. However, they are not as common as some other succulent varieties, so you may have to search a bit to find one.

Why are my bear paws falling off?

If the leaves on your plant are falling off, it is usually a sign of overwatering or pests. Be sure to check the roots of your plant to make sure they are not rotting, and take steps to correct the problem. Brown leaves can also be caused by too much sun exposure, so be sure to give your plant some protection from the hot afternoon sun.

Do succulents like to be touched?

No, succulents do not like to be touched. These plants are delicate, and can easily be damaged by too much handling. If you must handle your plant, be sure to do so gently and with clean hands.

Are coffee grounds good for succulents?

Coffee grounds can be used as a fertilizer for succulents. These plants prefer a well-draining soil, so be sure to mix the coffee grounds with other materials, such as sand or perlite, before adding them to the pot.

Conclusion

Bear paw succulent is an easy to care for succulent. In this post, Garden In The City has provided some tips on how to grow and care for your succulent. We hope you found this information helpful and that you will be able to enjoy your plants for years to come. Have any questions about growing or caring for your bear paw succulent? Let us know in the comments below.