Common Haworthia Types

19 Most Common Haworthia Types For Small Spaces

If you’re looking for a low-maintenance plant to add some life to your small space, look no further than the varied and interesting world of Haworthia. These plants are part of the succulent family and originates from South Africa. There are many different types of Haworthia, each with their own unique appearance. Here are 19 of the most common varieties that are perfect for small spaces.

Most Common Haworthia Types

Here are tops haworthia types for small spaces you should plant.

Haworthia herbacea

Haworthia herbacea is a species of the genus Haworthia in the family Asphodelaceae, endemic to South Africa. It is a small, perennial succulent with fleshy leaves and white flowers. The leaves are arranged in a rosette and are green with white spots. The flowers are borne on a short stalk and are white with purple stripes.

This species is found in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, where it occurs in sandstone fynbos on the slopes of the Amatola Mountains. It is relatively common in cultivation and is often grown as a houseplant.

Haworthia herbacea is an easy plant to grow and requires little care. It can be propagated by offsets or seed, and does not need much water. It prefers full sun to partial shade and well-drained soil.

Haworthia herbacea
Haworthia herbacea (By Youtube)

Haworthia retusa

Haworthia retusa is a succulent plant in the genus Haworthia. It is native to South Africa and is closely related to Haworthia fasciata. The plant has thick, fleshy leaves that are green with white stripes. The flowers are white and borne on long, thin stalks.

Haworthia retusa is an easy plant to care for and makes an ideal houseplant. It can be grown in a pot or in the ground, and does not require much water. The plant prefers bright light but can tolerate some shade. It can be propagated from offsets or leaf cuttings.

Haworthia retusa
Haworthia retusa (By Youtube)

Haworthia arachnoidea

Haworthia arachnoidea is a species of the genus Haworthia in the Asphodelaceae family. It is endemic to the Cape Provinces of South Africa. The species name is derived from the Latin arachnoidea, meaning “spider-like”, and refers to the plant’s spidery white flowers.

Haworthia arachnoidea is a small, succulent plant that grows to about 3-5 cm in height. The leaves are pale green, ovate-shaped, and have white spots on them. The flowers are white and spidery-looking, and they grow in clusters on long, thin stalks.

This plant is relatively easy to care for and can be grown in pots or containers. It prefers well-drained soil and full sun to partial shade.

Haworthia arachnoidea
Haworthia arachnoidea (By Youtube)

Haworthia coarctata var. adelaidensis

The Haworthia coarctata var. adelaidensis is a small, succulent plant that is native to South Africa. It is a member of the Asphodelaceae family and is closely related to the aloe plant. The Haworthia coarctata var. adelaidensis has thick, fleshy leaves that are green in color with white spots.

The leaves are arranged in a rosette pattern and the plant produces small, white flowers. The Haworthia coarctata var. adelaidensis is a popular choice for growing indoors as it does not require much light or water to thrive.

Haworthia coarctata var. adelaidensis
Haworthia coarctata var. adelaidensis (By Youtube)

Haworthia limifolia var. striata

Haworthia limifolia var. striata is a small, slow-growing succulent native to South Africa. It is a member of the Asphodelaceae family and is closely related to the Aloe plant. The leaves are thick and fleshy, with white stripes running along the length of the leaf. The flowers are small and white, blooming in summer.

This plant is perfect for those who are new to growing succulents, as it is very easy to care for. It can be propagated from offsets or leaf cuttings, and does not require much water or sunlight to thrive. However, Haworthia limifolia var. striata can be susceptible to mealybugs and other pests if not cared for properly.

Haworthia limifolia var. striata
Haworthia limifolia var. striata (By Youtube)

Haworthia emelyae var. comptoniana

Haworthia emelyae var. comptoniana is a small, slow-growing succulent plant that is native to South Africa. It is a member of the Asphodelaceae family and is closely related to the aloe plant.

The leaves of this plant are thick and fleshy, and they are arranged in a rosette pattern. The leaves are green with white spots or streaks, and the margins are serrated. The flowers of this plant are white or pale pink, and they bloom in summer.

Haworthia emelyae var. comptoniana
Haworthia emelyae var. comptoniana (By Youtube)

Haworthia bolusii

Haworthia bolusii is a small, perennial succulent plant native to South Africa. It is a member of the Asparagaceae family and is closely related to the more common Haworthia attenuata. The plant gets its common name from its thick, fleshy leaves that resemble a green sea sponge. H. bolusii is a slow-growing plant that can reach up to 8 inches in height and width.

The leaves are arranged in rosettes and are green with white stripes or spots. The flowers are small and white with six petals. H. bolusii is drought-tolerant and can tolerate some shade, but it prefers bright, indirect light.

Haworthia bolusii
Haworthia bolusii (By Youtube)

Haworthia fasciata

Haworthia fasciata is a species of the genus Haworthia in the family Asphodelaceae, endemic to the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. It is a small succulent plant, up to 8 cm (3.1 in) tall, with a rosette of fleshy leaves.

The leaves are dark green with white spots and streaks, and have sharp teeth on the margins. The flowers are white or pale pink, borne on a thin stalk up to 30 cm (12 in) tall.

Haworthia fasciata
Haworthia fasciata (By Istockphoto)

Haworthiopsis limifolia

Haworthiopsis limifolia is a species of flowering plant in the Asphodelaceae family. The plant is native to South Africa and has long, thin leaves that grow in a rosette pattern. The leaves are typically green, but some varieties may have white or yellow stripes. The flowers are small and white, and they bloom in the summer.

This hardy plant is relatively easy to care for and can tolerate a wide range of conditions. It prefers full sun but can also do well in partial shade. It is drought-tolerant and does not need much water, making it a good choice for those who want a low-maintenance plant. Haworthiopsis limifolia makes an excellent houseplant or addition to any outdoor garden.

Haworthiopsis limifolia
Haworthiopsis limifolia (By Istockphoto)

Haworthia koelmaniorum

Haworthia koelmaniorum is a small, succulent plant that is native to South Africa. It is a member of the Asphodelaceae family and is closely related to the aloe plant. The leaves of the Haworthia koelmaniorum are thick and fleshy, and they are arranged in a rosette pattern. The leaves are green with white spots, and the flowers are white.

The Haworthia koelmaniorum is a popular houseplant because it is easy to care for and it does not require a lot of water. This plant can be propagated by division or by seed, and it will thrive in a well-drained soil mix. The Haworthia koelmaniorum prefers bright light but can tolerate some shade. This plant is not cold hardy and should be protected from frost.

Haworthia koelmaniorum
Haworthia koelmaniorum (By Youtube)

Haworthia Jade Star

The Haworthia jade star is a beautiful succulent that is native to South Africa. It has thick, fleshy leaves that are arranged in a rosette pattern and can range in color from green to gray-green. The leaves are covered in white spots or streaks, which give the plant its common name.

The Haworthia jade star is a slow-growing plant, but it can eventually reach up to 12 inches in diameter. It is an easy plant to care for and does not require much water.

Haworthia Jade Star
Haworthia Jade Star (By Youtube)

Haworthia springbokvlakensis

Haworthia springbokvlakensis is a succulent plant that is native to South Africa. It is a member of the Asphodelaceae family and is closely related to the aloe plant. The plant gets its name from its spring-like growth habit and small, white flowers.

The leaves of Haworthia springbokvlakensis are thick and fleshy, with a light green coloration. They are arranged in rosettes and have a crinkled or wavy appearance. The leaf margins are often lined with small, white bumps or teeth.

This succulent is relatively easy to grow and can be propagated by offsets or leaf cuttings. It prefers well-drained soil and full sun to partial shade exposure.

Haworthia springbokvlakensis
Haworthia springbokvlakensis (By Youtube)

Haworthia cooperi picturata

Haworthia cooperi picturata is a small, succulent plant that is native to South Africa. The leaves of the plant are thick and fleshy, and are arranged in a rosette pattern. The leaves are green with white spots, and the flowers are white.

The plant grows in full sun to partial shade, and prefers well-drained soil. It is drought tolerant and does not require much water. The plant can be propagated by offsets or leaf cuttings.

Haworthia cooperi picturata
Haworthia cooperi picturata (By Youtube)

Haworthia bayeri

Haworthia bayeri is a member of the Haworthiad genus and is endemic to the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. It is a small, succulent plant that typically grows to only about 5 cm in height. The leaves are dark green with white spots and stripes, and the flowers are small and white.

This plant is named after German botanist, Adolf Bayer. Bayer was the director of the Botanical Garden in Berlin-Dahlem, and he specialized in the study of succulent plants. He described this species in 1906.

Haworthia bayeri is not a very common plant, but it can be found in some nurseries and online stores that sell succulents. It is a relatively easy plant to care for and does not require much water or sunlight.

Haworthia bayeri
Haworthia bayeri (By Youtube)

Haworthia Tropical Night

There are more than 60 species of Haworthia. They are a small, slow-growing succulent from South Africa. The leaves are fleshy and often have white spots or stripes. The flowers are small and white.

Haworthia Tropical Night is a species of Haworthia that is native to South Africa. It is a small, slow-growing succulent that has fleshy leaves with white spots or stripes. The flowers are small and white. This plant is perfect for growing in pots or as groundcover in gardens.

Haworthia Tropical Night
Haworthia Tropical Night (By Istockphoto)

Haworthia reticulata

Haworthia reticulata is a plant that belongs to the genus Haworthia. It is native to South Africa and grows in the form of rosettes.

The leaves of this plant are thick and fleshy, and are arranged in a spiral pattern. The flowers of H. reticulata are white in color and grow in clusters. This plant requires well-drained soil and plenty of sunlight to thrive.

Haworthia reticulata
Haworthia reticulata (By Youtube)

Haworthia Chocolate

Haworthia Chocolate is a small, perennial succulent plant native to the Cape Provinces of South Africa. The plant is named for its chocolate-brown leaves, which are covered in white spots.

The plant grows to a height of 8 inches and has a spread of 12 inches. The flowers are white and blooming occurs in late summer. Haworthia Chocolate is an easy plant to care for and requires little water. The plant can be propagated by offsets or leaf cuttings and does best in full sun to partial shade.

Haworthia Chocolate
Haworthia Chocolate (By Youtube)

Haworthia truncata

Haworthia truncata is a small succulent that is native to South Africa. It is a member of the Asphodelaceae family and is related to the aloe plant.

The leaves of the Haworthia truncata are thick and fleshy, and they grow in a rosette shape. The leaves are green with white stripes, and the flowers are white. The Haworthia truncata is an easy plant to care for, and it makes an excellent houseplant.

Haworthia truncata
Haworthia truncata (By Istockphoto)

Haworthia transiens

Haworthia transiens is a small, succulent plant that is native to South Africa. The leaves of this plant are thick and fleshy, and they grow in a rosette formation. The leaves are green with white stripes running along the length of them.

This plant flowers in the summer, and the flowers are white with purple streaks. Haworthia transiens is a low-maintenance plant that does not require much water or care. This plant makes an excellent houseplant or addition to a succulent garden.

Haworthia transiens
Haworthia transiens (By Istockphoto)

Frequently asked questions about haworthia

How big do Haworthias get?

The size of a Haworthia depends on the species, but they are generally small plants. Some species can reach up to 6 inches in height, while others only grow to be a few inches tall.

Do Haworthias need full sun?

No, Haworthias do not need full sun. They can grow in partial sun or shade.

What is the difference between Haworthia fasciata and Haworthia attenuata?

Haworthia fasciata and Haworthia attenuata are both succulent plants in the genus Haworthia. They are native to South Africa and are often used as ornamental plants.

H. fasciata is characterized by its green leaves with white stripes, while H. attenuata has softer, more translucent leaves.

What is the difference between Haworthia and Haworthiopsis?

Haworthia and Haworthiopsis are both succulent plants in the Asphodelaceae family. They are native to southern Africa and are closely related.

The main difference between the two is that Haworthia have thicker, fleshier leaves, while Haworthiopsis have thinner leaves.

Do Haworthias like to be root bound?

Haworthias do not like to be root bound, and will often stop growing if they are. If you notice your Haworthia is not growing as quickly as it used to, check to see if the roots are crowded and need to be transplanted.

How do you care for Haworthiopsis attenuata?

Haworthiopsis attenuata is a succulent plant, so it does not require much water. Allow the soil to dry out completely between watering. This plant prefers bright light, but can tolerate some shade. It is best to fertilize in the spring and summer months.

Why is my haworthia flowering?

There are a few reasons why your Haworthia might be flowering. One possibility is that the plant is stressed, and flowers are its way of reproducing.

Another possibility is that the plant is getting too much sun or too much water. If you think either of these might be the case, try adjusting your plant’s care regimen and see if that makes a difference.

How do you propagate haworthia?

Haworthia can be propagated by offsets, leaf cuttings, or seed.

How do you make Haworthia grow faster?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the best way to make Haworthia grow faster will vary depending on the specific plant and growing conditions. However, some tips to promote faster growth in Haworthia include providing bright light, using a well-draining potting mix, and avoiding overwatering.

How do you make Haworthia plump?

Haworthia can be plump by adding water to the soil, or by using a pebble tray.

How often should you water a Haworthia?

You should water your Haworthia about once a week, letting the soil dry out in between waterings.

Can Haworthia grow in water?

Yes, Haworthia can grow in water. However, it is important to note that Haworthia is a succulent plant and does not require a lot of water. If you water your Haworthia too much, the plant will rot.

Does Haworthia propagate from leaves?

No, Haworthia does not propagate from leaves.

Conclusion

In conclusion, there are many different types of Haworthia that are perfect for small spaces that Gardeninthecity.net recommend. With so many options to choose from, there is sure to be a type that is perfect for your home or office. With their low maintenance and easy care, Haworthias are a great choice for those who want to add a touch of green to their space without a lot of work.